Effect of public financing of reproductive, maternal, newborn, adolescent, and child health interventions on household finances

This project is studying the health and financial benefits of public investments in reproductive, maternal, newborn, adolescent, and child health (RMNACH). In four of the six countries where we have ongoing research—Ghana, India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, and Nigeria—RMNACH conditions account for over 50% of the burden of disease, as measured in disability-adjusted life years. The toll that this burden exerts on individual and family finances is enormous. A recent study showed that while the incidence of catastrophic health expenses seems to be reducing in Ghana and Sri Lanka, it has remained unchanged in Kenya, and is on an upward trend in Nigeria and India. If these trends continue, poor families in these countries would be left behind in the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to RMNCAH. Progress would also be delayed on another important SDG goal: reducing poverty.

This project will generate evidence to inform policy makers through the assessment of the potential health and financial benefits that would accrue to households from the adoption of different funding mechanisms for RMNACH in India and Nigeria. This analysis will (a) examine the potential economic impact on households from public investments in RMNCAH interventions, and (b) assess the differential distribution of the benefits across household income profiles.

Wenhui Mao, Center for Policy Impact in Global Health
Osondu Ogbuoji, Center for Policy Impact in Global Health
Gavin Yamey, Center for Policy Impact in Global Health

This project started June 2019. The first publication is scheduled for December 2019.

This work is funded by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health.

Questions? Please contact Osondu Ogbuoji.

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